King Edward Park, Wickham Park and Roma Street Parklands

Fast Facts

Duration: 2-3 hours
Price Guide: $0
Last Reviewed:
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King Edward Park, Wickham Park and Roma Street Parklands

Roma Street Parklands is renowned throughout Brisbane for being one of their most beautiful parks. All three parks are located next to each other and are within easy walking distance of the city centre. Roma Street train station is located right next to the park; alternatively you can also catch a bus to Wickham Terrace and get off at either: the Windmill stop, the Goodearth stop or the Holy Spirit stop (opposite the hospital)

Starting the tour

Start at Central Station.

Section 1:
Directions:

Turn right out of Central Station onto Ann Street, then immediately turn right again onto Edward Street.

Stopover:

Edward Street is host to some of Australia’s most renowned designers, including menswear stores, high-end fashion and, for those who need pampering after shopping, day spas!

Section 2:
Directions:

Walk to the top of the hill and cross at the traffic lights, King Edward Park is in front of you.

Stopover:

It would be difficult to glorify King Edward Park, so I won’t. Basically, it’s a small hill adjoining Wickham Park thats been named after King Edward. There is a long staircase called Jacobs Ladder leading up the side of the park. If I’m scraping the barrel here, it does have a few nice sculptures and some other art to look at and is pleasant enough to spend a few minutes wander through. Plus it’s the easiest route to see the other two parks.

Section 3:
Directions:

Walk through King Edward Park (uphill). When you reach the top, turn left onto Wickham Terrace. You will be able to enter Wickham Park by The Windmill, which is about 30m to your left.

Stopover:

Now, the windmill is used as a weather observatory – prior to that it was used as a signal tower, announcing shipping movements using flags hung from a nearby post.

The windmill holds strong historical importance for Brisbane; therefore plans to undertake its conservation were long and meticulous. A decision was eventually made to apply a new render coat to block out moisture and repair and repaint the exterior. Today, it still stands in good stead, and is an impressive building that is held in high regard by many Queenslanders.

Section 4:
Directions:

Go for a walk through Wickham Park.

Stopover:

Wickham Park is named after John Clements Wickham, (1798-1864) who was both a naval officer and a judge. He was a lieutenant on the HMS Beagle from 1831-1836.

In the top left hand corner of the park is an unobtrusive air raid shelter (it looks like a bus stop). 235 of there were built around Brisbane during the Second World War. Only 21 survive to this day.

Section 5:
Directions:

Exit Wickham Park on the north-west side, by the air raid shelters (SOHO Hotel to your right). Cross the road. Directly in front of you is Roma Street Parklands; the entrance is 40m to your right (still on Wickham Terrace)

Stopover:

The Upper Parkland has an ampitheatre which occasionally holds small concerts and events, and was originally known as Albert Park. Various artworks are scattered around the parklands – during its creation 16 local artists were commissioned to create artworks representative of Queensland (Art Walk tours are available)

Section 6:
Directions:

The quickest route back to the city is to walk down Albert Street (adjoining Wickham Terrace)

Stopover:
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