Queen Street Mall

Fast Facts

Duration: 2-3 hours
Price Guide: $0
Last Reviewed:
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Queen Street Mall
Starting the tour

Start at Central Station

Section 1:
Directions:

From Central Station, exit via the main entrance and turn right onto Ann Street. Cross the road and take your first left down Edward Street.

Stopover:

Edward Street is host to some of Australia’s most renowned designers, including menswear stores, high-end fashion and, for those who need pampering after shopping, day spas!

Section 2:
Directions:

Continue walking down the hill for about 5 minutes; soon you will see Queen Street Mall on your right (just after Adelaide Street).

Stopover:

Queen Street Mall – originally part of Queen Street – is named after Queen Victoria, and has been closed to traffic since 1982. Since then it has become home to more than 700 specialty stores, including six centres. It is a place you could easily spend a whole day sauntering around – jam packed with everything from food, fashion, banking, entertainment, drinks and a cinema; it’s pretty hard to get bored here. And even if you did, Brisbane Square – home to the famous Treasury Casino – is just at the top end of the street, adjoined by the striking Brisbane river.

Section 3:
Directions:

You will enter at the bottom end of Queen Street (to your right is Woolworths and Dymocks, but not much else down that direction).

Stopover:

Directly in front is an information centre with friendly and helpful staff, should you have any enquiries – there’s often events happening in the centre of Brisbane, so it’s worth asking what’s on.

Section 4:
Directions:

Continue down Queen St Mall.

Stopover:

There are four restaurant/cafes dotted directly through the centre of Queen St Mall. These being: The Pig n Whistle, Jimmys on the Mall, Cafe East and Milano. All are unique in their own ways; The Pig n Whistle is a modern take on a traditional British pub, regularly showing sports such as cricket or football. It’s a place for people watching, to sit, enjoy a leisurely lunch and mull over your latte; not grab a quick bite. Throughout the day it is lively and packed; but in the evening the atmosphere winds down and becomes much more relaxed. (N.B treat yourself to coffee and cake in Jimmys on the Mall – chocolate hazelnut cake – need I say more)

Section 5:
Directions:

Continue down Queen Street.

Stopover:

There is a huge MYER Centre here (with probably one of the better food courts) along with other various department stores and hoardes of high street stores. If you’re thirsty, FJ’s juice stall, located just in the entrance of the centre, sells an assortment of wonderful freshly squeezed juices for a mere $2.

If you look a little more carefully you will find one-off boutiques dotted around. Along with the exclusive designer stores, there are thankfully an equal number of cheap and cheerful ones (Target saves the day again for backpackers).

Section 6:
Directions:

Keep walking along Queen Street.

Stopover:

To look at the Queen Adelaide Building today – filled with high street fashion stores – (90-112 Queen Street) it is hard to imagine it as its former occupation, a convict barrack. It is one of Brisbane’s oldest buildings.

Section 7:
Directions:

Keep going!

Stopover:

The heritage-listed Brisbane Arcade (160 Queen St Mall) is a three-level shopping galleria said to hold some of the most sought-after designers in the fashion industry. It was built in 1923 for a Dr James Mayne and his sister, Miss Mary Emelia Mayne; thus the site originally being the home of the Mayne family. Interestingly this particular shopping arcade has claims of scandal, insanity, even murder, in its early history.

Section 8:
Directions:

On the left hand side of the street (no 167) is the Regent Cinema.

Stopover:

This place is impressive enough to go in just to look at – built in 1929, this is one of four Regent cinemas, all of which were built in the 1920s. They were designed to be both theatre and cinema; reminiscent of Hollywood’s Golden Era. The architect who designed it, Charles N. Hollinshed, was in fact from Melbourne. He also had assistance from Aaron Bolot and Richard Gailey Junior, who were from Brisbane.

Section 9:
Directions:

Further along Queen Street

Stopover:

For those who are interested, there is a hairdressers on the right at the top of the street; the ‘Brisbane School of Hairdressing’. Cuts start at a paltry $15, if you’re on a budget. Right next to it is a discount book store (books are notoriously expensive in Australia, so take advantage).

Section 10:
Directions:

Also on Queen Street

Stopover:

Oasis juice Bar, located between Milano and Cafe East, serves up a delightful array of fresh fruits and bungs them all in a blender, giving you a stupendously healthy smoothie. As far as pubs go, Mick O Malley’s is a jolly Irish bar you could happily sup a few Tooheys in.

Section 11:
Directions:

Once you have reached the top of Queen Street Mall (George Street end), Brisbane Square, home to the Treasury Casino, is directly in front of you. Just beyond that is Victoria Bridge, which leads over Brisbane River to South Bank. If you want to see Adelaide Street, turn right onto George Street and take the next right.

Stopover:

Upon quick passing Adelaide Street seems dull, unexciting, with little to offer except mundane views of office buildings. Do not be so hasty to dismiss it – for those who are dedicated enough to seek it out, there is a heritage strip on the west end of the street (near South Bank) which features some one-off specialty shops.

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The Tour Guide